For parents

ENGinfograffa

What is the Kumita campaign?

Kumita is funded by the ministry of social affairs and health. It’s a joint educational campaign by Väestöliitto and The National Institute for Health and Welfare and it’s aimed at middle-school aged teenagers. Half of Finnish teenagers have had their first sexual experience by the time they turn seventeen. That is why it’s important to tell young people about prevention well in advance. The campaign is intended to elaborate in a positive way on using condoms as a way of preventing sexually transmitted diseases.

Why this campaign?

The campaign is not meant to replace schools’ sexual education nor diminish the role of parents. Every teenager absorbs information in their own way, so it’s important to have different ways of educating and upbringing. The campaign is aimed at refuting some common myths surrounding the condom. Through the campaign, teenagers learn to be more relaxed about condoms, to think about condoms as trusted basics that teenagers should always keep with them. The number of sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers has remained stable, even though teenage pregnancies have decreased during the last few years. According to a school health survey, about one in five middle-school aged teenagers did not use any kind of prevention the last time they had sexual intercourse. Talking about sexuality, sex and prevention neither instigates risky behaviour in young people nor triggers premature sexual activity. Receiving the appropriate information helps teenagers to take care of themselves and to avoid risks.

What do the campaign slogans mean?

The slogan ”Your trusted basic. Always at hand” affirms the idea that the condom is part of a select group of necessary, basic things that you always have with you. The slogan equates the condom with your mobile, keys or other necessary basics – every item has its own important purpose. The campaign is a reminder that teenagers should always have condoms with them and that condoms are like any other everyday item. Incorporating condoms into everyday life makes it easier to buy and talk about them. ”Kumita. When it’s time” encourages teenagers to use condoms – in other words, to rubber up when it’s time. The last part of the slogan hints gently at the fact that everyone starts using condoms at their own pace and that there’s no fixed age for starting.

Who is behind Kumita?

The Kumita campaign is the product of sexual health experts from Väestöliitto and The National Institute for Health and Welfare. The campaign material is based on many years’ experience in working with customers, as well as on research done among youth and adolescents. The ideology behind the campaign comprises the WHO’s joint European guidelines on sexual education, knowledge on adolescents’ psychophysical and sexual development, and sexual rights.

Where is Kumita happening?

With the Kumita campaign, teenagers get to play games, download a roleplay-type application to their mobiles and take part in discussions on social media (Facebook, Instagram) as well as contribute with material themselves. Eighth graders will receive one campaign condom each from their school nurses in the fall 2016.

The Kumita website has links to all available material and there’s also campaign information for parents and experts.

How does Kumita work?

There are various obstacles associated with purchasing and using condoms. Kumita aims to remove these obstacles and enhance the image of the condom. The goal with Kumita is to make it easier for young people to familiarize themselves with condoms. The campaign also engcourages making it basic practise to buy and use condoms as part of taking care of oneself. The campaign respects the fact that teenagers develop at their own pace and it doesn’t infringe on this. Most young people are interested in matters regarding sex long before they have their first sexual experience. It’s important, that they are given expert information and that this is provided in a safe way. Kumita’s material incorporates humour as a way of making it easier for people to approach new, possibly even unsettling and exciting issues.